If your car ever happens to stop in front of a painted egg museum in Romania, I recommend you go inside

We were traveling East, though the mountains of Northern Romania.  This (and the occasional cascade of sheep across the highway) was our view:

mountains

Normally I’d have micromanaged every stop on our itinerary, but we were in the unusual position of taking a private tour—something I’d sorted out at the last minute so we could visit the famous painted monasteries in the time our schedule allowed.  Our guide Florin, a kind man and safe driver, is oddly shy for a professional guide and his tour consisted of driving for a while in silence, and then pulling over to indicate we’d reached a site.

egghouse

As we entered into the Bucovina region, we noticed houses painted with lovely geometric designs.

eggposter

Florin stopped the car in front of one of these pretty decorated buildings and announced “The painted egg museum.”

eggs4

The awkwardly named International Museum of The Decorated Eggs is full of these well-crafted beauties.  It’s a place I never would have planned to visit on my own, and yet our stop here increased my already robust admiration of Romanian cultural traditions.

eggs1

The museum had a work station where you could try out the resist technique used in the egg’s creation.  Basically, you dye the eggs a base color and then paint on a wax resist, then over-paint the egg again.  Once you’ve added all the colors you want, you remove the wax to reveal the original layer.

eggs3

Some of the egg designs reminded me of the embroidered clothes we saw in the Maramureș region of Romania.

eggs2

Ah—a tiny Byzantine style portrait!

twinegss

HOB and I had friends about to be married back at home, and bought these two painted eggs from the museum for them as a wedding present—rather an appropriate gift, since our friends are what’s known as nesters.  Getting these eggs back to Chicago unbroken inside our backpacks was an act of unsung skill and heroism.

 

How we got to International Museum of The Decorated Eggs: Florin from Casa Muntean drove us.

Where we slept: Hotel Residenz.  Price: €31.50 for a double.  Recommended: yes.

 

 

30 comments

  1. Great post 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks–Happy Spring! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you too 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m from Romania but I’ve never been to this museum.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re so lucky to be from the gorgeous country of Romania! Time for you to make a road trip to see the painted eggs.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, my country is gorgeous, I lived in a beautiful town named Arad, I don’t know if you heard about it. Now I live in Spain.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Love them, so glad you got them home ok 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Our friends were happy with them too!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Maybe one day we will get to visit 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Happy Easter !! Great day !!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Happy Easter inkyfire!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wonderful!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Jean!

      Like

  6. Eggcellent (excuse the pun) Easter post and beautiful eggs. I like that the ones you chose for your friends are patterned like wedding outfits.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m bEGGing you for more puns, Profusion of Eccentricities!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. it’s the unexpected, unplanned things that so often are the highlights.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So true, and good advice for me to lay off the micromanaging a bit!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Absoltely MUST!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think you would also love the homemade food in Romania, Rotwein Wanderer.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Wonderful pictures! But, the painted egg is not uniquely Romanian. My mother’s parents were Ukrainian and Ukraine is very famous for their painted Easter eggs. My mother used to do them (but not NEARLY as colorful and incredibly artistic…) for Easter when I was a child. I remember her melting the bees wax and using a pin head to put the melted wax on the egg. One of my very few memories of her really, but a cherished one! Thanks for the great report. Sometimes the best things on a trip are unplanned and unexpected!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you AGMA. I remember reading a touching post about how you lost your mom at a young age. I’m glad you have the smell of bees wax and the memory of painted eggs to remember her by. We were actually quite close to Ukraine for much of our trip and I’m sure the cultural traditions overlap.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. You were saving these photos for today! Clever. Did you know that the largest such Easter egg in the world is in Canada, in Vegreville Alberta? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegreville_egg

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I try to be clever sometimes, but mostly these days I’m just trying to keep my skirt from being tucked into my tights after I leave a public restroom.

      I’d like to see the basket that holds that giant egg in Vegreville!

      Like

  11. So beautiful! I would have loved to have seen that in person! Beats my lame egg-dyeing skills, haha. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I watched that wonderful video you posted about the egg painting lady. The reason she’s so good at it is she’s been doing it since she was a teenager. I’m happy to hear they have a new generation carrying on the tradition.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I once lived in the area you are visiting, northern Romania. Just this year I actually painted eggs (decorated eggs really) Romanian style. I can share my photo if you like?! Enjoy your time in Maramures!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’d love to see your photo, thanks!

      Like

  13. They look lovely, and are definitely the kind of things which would make great presents. Aren’t these eggs boiled before being painted? If yes, that would make them a little easier to carry.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The artist pokes a hole in the egg and blows out the white/yolk so it’s really light (and easy to smash!)

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: